Police earning the hate

Shyster
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Police earning the hate

Postby Shyster » Tue Mar 02, 2021 5:24 pm

Caught on tape: Phoenix DUI officer's tactics under investigation
https://www.abc15.com/news/local-news/i ... estigation
PHOENIX — Phoenix's most senior DUI motorcycle officer is under internal investigation after ABC15 uncovered a video of him explaining how to manipulate police reports to disadvantage defense attorneys in criminal cases.

The new allegations against Officer Michael McGillis come a week after ABC15 reported on mounting complaints of rudeness and excessive force against him.

McGillis's bodycam caught his discussion with a sergeant and other officers after he arrested Mariah Valenzuela in January 2020. Valenzuela is suing the City of Phoenix alleging McGillis violated her civil rights.

In the video, McGillis explained why officers should list passengers as "victims" not "witnesses" in all DUI cases, so they would be "state witnesses" instead of "defense witnesses."

"They [defense attorneys] don't get to interview them [passengers considered victims]," McGillis said, "and they don't get to conjure up a B.S. story altogether."

“All your passengers are victims,” McGillis concluded to a nearby sergeant who took out paper and started jotting notes. You can watch the unedited exchange in the viewer below.

“When I watched that, the first thing I thought was shady police work,” said Aaron Black, a defense attorney who specializes in DUI cases.

McGillis is the department’s most senior DUI motor officer, and he processes hundreds of suspected impaired drivers annually. McGillis also appeared to take his own advice. ABC15 obtained a 2019 report, authored by McGillis, where all three adult passengers were listed as victims during a DUI investigation that did not involve a crash.

"My overall impression of this guy is that he shouldn't be a police officer," said criminal defense attorney James Palestini.

Multiple criminal defense attorneys told ABC15 misclassifying people in a car during a DUI case could impact defendants' rights to fair trials.

“You essentially are violating the person's constitutional rights,” said defense attorney Caroline Aeed. “You're interfering with witnesses that are part of the investigation.”

Defense attorneys can interview witnesses to learn how the driver was behaving on the road and how the officer handled a traffic stop, sobriety tests, and an arrest.

The defense can call witnesses to testify regardless of whether the prosecution does.

Victims, however, get special protections from the prosecutor's office. Victim's rights limit defense attorneys’ access to them.

The attorneys said Arizona law would allow passengers under 15 years old to be considered victims or people who were involved in a DUI crash; however, any other passengers would be solely witnesses, they said.

Officer McGillis's theory on DUI reporting seems to be in opposition to Phoenix police policy. Operations Order 6.4 said, “Names of witnesses/occupants will be listed in the IR [Incident Report’s] Other Persons section.”

After ABC15 sent a Phoenix police spokeswoman a video clip of McGillis speaking and a copy of the police policy, she responded that McGillis was now under investigation by the Phoenix Police Department’s Professional Standards Bureau. Officer McGillis remains on regular duty.

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Police earning the hate

Postby MR25 » Tue Mar 09, 2021 2:21 pm


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Police earning the hate

Postby Shyster » Thu Mar 11, 2021 6:05 pm

Revealed: weak rules allow the world's largest police forces to kill
https://www.theguardian.com/global-deve ... es-to-kill
Police departments in major cities across the world give their officers legal impunity to use lethal force even when their lives are not in danger, according to new research commissioned by the Guardian.

The study by the University of Chicago and its research partners found that not one police department of the cities surveyed had policies that were consistent with human rights guidelines set forth by the UN when it comes to use-of-force policies.

The report involved 48 major US and international cities, many in some of the richest, most democratic countries in the world.

This research reveals that not only are police officers in the US and beyond acting violently with impunity, but that their professional codes allow them to do so. The research comes as police forces are under intense scrutiny in the year after the brutal killing of George Floyd by Minneapolis police and the unprecedented wave of uprisings that followed.

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Police earning the hate

Postby Shyster » Thu Mar 11, 2021 6:30 pm

MSP trooper charged with felonious assault after telling K9 to hold pleading, unresisting man
LANSING — A Michigan State Police trooper has been charged with felonious assault in connection with a traffic stop where he let his K9 partner attack the driver for several minutes despite the driver not resisting or fleeing.

Parker Surbrook, a trooper assigned to MSP's Lansing post, is on unpaid leave while the charges play out in court. He was removed from the K9 unit.

The charge relates to a Nov. 13 arrest in Lansing, according to an MSP press release. Surbrook conducted a traffic stop on a vehicle leaving an “illegal activity spot” where the passenger was believed to be armed, according to the MSP report.

Surbrook worked with the Lansing Police Department Secure Cities Partnership and on the Violent Crime Impact team. He was working with VCI during the arrest in question.

The driver fled and crashed the vehicle into a tree. The driver was out of his vehicle when Surbrook and an undercover officer from the Lansing Police Department arrived at the crash. Surbrook let his K9 bite and grab the driver for about four minutes, according to the video.
...
The K9, Knox, can be heard whining when Surbrook pulled up to the crash scene. The driver was on the ground and had rolled over onto his back just prior to Knox’s approach.

Surbrook rushed out of his car with the dog, yelling “stop him, stop him, stop him, stop him, stay on the ground (expletive).”

The driver said “I’m done, I’m done” and made no attempts to get up. Surbrook keeps yelling “stop him” as Knox bites and grabs the man.
...
The man said, “I’m not moving, please get him,” begging Surbrook to call off Knox.

He starts pleading, “please sir…sir,” and Surbrook tells Knox “good boy” and “stay on him.”

Driver: “Please sir, he’s on my face.”

Surbrook: “I don’t care.”

Driver: “I’m not moving, sir, I’m not moving.”

Surbrook: “Do you got him?” He asks the other officer if he has the passenger under control.

Driver: “Please sir my legs are tore up, you got me. Sir?”

Surbrook: “Stay on him.”

Driver: “Please sir, please sir, please I’m begging you sir, please sir, please, please sir…please.”

The driver continued to plead with Surbrook to get Knox off him. Surbrook ignored his pleas.

“Come on, sir…He’s trying to choke me. Sir, please, please stop, please,” the driver said. “Sir he’s choking me sir.”

Surbrook said again, “I don’t care.”

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Police earning the hate

Postby Shyster » Fri Mar 12, 2021 8:38 pm

Highly critical report faults LAPD for mishandling summer George Floyd unrest
https://www.latimes.com/california/stor ... mer-unrest
The Los Angeles Police Department mishandled the unrest that erupted on L.A. streets after the death of George Floyd, a result of poor planning, inadequate training and a disregard for rules on mass arrests and crowd control that were established after past failures to manage protests, according to a new report commissioned by the City Council.

“It is unfortunate that the same issues have arisen again and again, with the department being unable or unwilling to rectify the problem,” the report, prepared by a team of former LAPD commanders, stated.

Hundreds of people were injured or alleged their rights were violated during the summer protests. Officers were sent into the streets with hard-foam projectile weapons that they weren’t adequately trained to use, and police commanders without up-to-date training in crowd control tactics were put in charge of volatile scenes, according to the report.

Secret “shadow teams” of undercover officers were sent into crowds without sufficient means of relaying their intelligence to commanders. And high-level leaders swooped into conflicts and gave orders that contradicted those already disseminated to officers, the report found.

Officers formed skirmish lines and squared off with unthreatening protesters who had their hands up, even as others who were throwing objects at police from deeper in the crowds and organized groups who were running teams of burglars into surrounding businesses were left to operate freely, the report found.

Meanwhile, protesters accused of minor offenses that only warranted citations in the field were subjected to hours-long detentions, all part of a “last-minute, uncoordinated effort” by officers to arrest thousands without any clear plan for transporting or jailing those they were rounding up, the report found.

“Seeing these problems resurface almost 10 years later suggests costly stagnation or worse,” Harris-Dawson said.

Mayor Eric Garcetti said the report “makes clear we need to see better training, policies, and procedures” to ensure police can facilitate peaceful protests while maintaining safety.

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Police earning the hate

Postby Shyster » Wed Mar 17, 2021 12:00 am

Lawsuit: Florida Parents Partner with IJ to Shut Down Dystopian “Predictive Policing” Program
Institute for Justice lawsuit alleges that Pasco police harass and fine homeowners to make their “lives miserable until they move or sue.” Today, they sued.


https://ij.org/press-release/lawsuit-fl ... g-program/
Pasco County, Florida’s future policing program is as dystopian as it is unconstitutional. Under the guise of “predictive policing,” for the last 10 years the Pasco County sheriff’s department has used a crude computer algorithm to identify and target supposed “future criminals.” Once identified, these supposed “prolific offenders”—many of whom are minors—are relentlessly surveilled and harassed. As a Tampa Bay Times in-depth investigation uncovered, police regularly show up at their homes unannounced and demand entry. If they or their parents don’t cooperate, police write tickets for petty violations, like missing house numbers or having grass that is too tall. As one former Pasco County deputy put it, they were under orders to “make their lives miserable until they move or sue.”

After weathering years of misery, today a group of Pasco residents partnered with the Institute for Justice—a nonprofit public interest law firm—to sue the county and put an end to its predictive policing program once and for all. The lawsuit, which was filed in federal court, argues that the county violated residents’ First, Fourth and Fourteenth Amendment rights.

“Pasco’s program seems like it was ripped from the pages of a dystopian sci-fi novel and not a manual on effective police strategies,” said Institute for Justice Attorney Ari Bargil. “This program isn’t just unethical, it’s patently unconstitutional to use a crude computer calculation to target, harass, fine, and even arrest citizens who have done nothing wrong.”

Robert Jones, a plaintiff in the lawsuit, knows the cruelties of Pasco’s program firsthand. In 2015, Robert’s teenage son had a number of run-ins with the law. That landed his son on Pasco’s “prolific offender” list. Shortly thereafter deputies started to conduct “prolific offender checks.” These warrantless “checks” involved repeated, unannounced visits to Robert’s home at all hours of the day. Robert grew tired of the harassment and stopped cooperating with police. That only made matters worse.

Code enforcement is a common tactic to compel cooperation. One deputy said they would “literally go out there and take a tape measure and measure the grass if somebody didn’t want to cooperate with us.” In Robert’s case, deputies cited him for tall grass, but failed to notify him of the citation. Then, when he failed to appear for a hearing that he was never told was happening, they arrested him for failure to appear.

All told, Robert was arrested five times by Pasco deputies. Although the bogus charges never stuck—they were all dropped—the harassment accomplished its goal: Robert ultimately moved his family out of Pasco County to escape the constant harassment from the Sheriff’s Office.

“I lived through a living hell because a computer program said my family didn’t belong in Pasco,” said Robert Jones. “I only thought this kind of thing happened in movies, not in America. We’ve got rights. And I’m going to stand up for them and shut this program down.”

Predictive policing gained prominence in the late 2000s as a way for police to use data to better allocate resources. Cities including Los Angeles and Chicago experimented with predictive policing but have subsequently scrapped their programs because of civil rights and effectiveness concerns. In most cases, police departments used data to identify geographic areas in need of additional resources. But Pasco took it one step further by using data to target specific individuals.

“Pasco defends its program as a crime fighting tool,” said Institute for Justice Attorney Robert Johnson. “But in America, there is no such thing as ‘innocent until predicted guilty.’ The government cannot harass people at their homes just because it thinks they might commit some unspecified future crime.”

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Police earning the hate

Postby MR25 » Wed Mar 17, 2021 1:58 pm



Killing 8 people is now considered "having a bad day".

It's even worse hearing this, when you juxtapose it with how police handle situations like George Floyd.

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Police earning the hate

Postby tifosi77 » Wed Mar 17, 2021 2:33 pm

It sounds dismissive, but that really is a common underpinning of a lot of crimes of this nature; the "one bad day" theory. And it is often times something a well-adjusted person would consider trivial at worst, but for whatever reason it serves as a trigger to violence in some.

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Police earning the hate

Postby MR25 » Wed Mar 17, 2021 2:46 pm

I guess my issue is more with how/who that phrase is used and the contexts it is used in.

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Police earning the hate

Postby nocera » Thu Mar 18, 2021 11:38 am

Home surveillance camera shows officer lied on report when charging man with major crimes
https://www.abcactionnews.com/news/loca ... jor-crimes
A Lake Wales man, who could have been sent to prison for years based on the claims in a police report, was saved by a home surveillance camera. It showed he didn’t attack an officer, as claimed in the report.

After Cordero shared the footage with police, Officer Black wrote in another report, "I believe my perception was altered due to the high stress of the incident.”

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Police earning the hate

Postby Shyster » Thu Mar 18, 2021 5:53 pm

Former Loveland police officer facing 16 counts of rape, sexual battery
https://www.wcpo.com/news/local-news/ha ... al-battery
Hamilton County, OH — A former Loveland police officer faces more than a dozen counts of sexual assault, prosecutors announced Monday afternoon.

In a news release, Hamilton County Prosecutor Joe Deters announced a grand jury had indicted Anthony Pecord, 48, on eight counts of rape and eight counts of sexual battery.

A former Loveland police officer faces more than a dozen counts of sexual assault, prosecutors announced Monday afternoon.

In a news release, Hamilton County Prosecutor Joe Deters announced a grand jury had indicted Anthony Pecord, 48, on eight counts of rape and eight counts of sexual battery.

In Hamilton County court filings, prosecutors said Pecord assaulted an individual on Jan. 24, while he was still a sworn officer with the Loveland Police Department, after “administering an intoxicant to (the victim) surreptitiously.”

Monday's release indicated prosecutors "are concerned that more victims may be out there."

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Postby tifosi77 » Thu Mar 18, 2021 6:04 pm

Vanessa Bryant names deputies who allegedly took photos of crash site
In a series of Instagram posts on Wednesday, Vanessa Bryant revealed the names of the four Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department deputies who allegedly took or shared grisly photos of the scene of the helicopter crash that killed her husband, NBA legend Kobe Bryant, their daughter Gianna, and seven others.

The posts were of an amended complaint -- filed Wednesday in U.S. District Court in Los Angeles and obtained by CNN -- that named deputies Joey Cruz, Rafael Mejia, Michael Russell, and Raul Versales as the defendants, in addition to Los Angeles County, its sheriff and fire departments. The lawsuit seeks damages, claiming negligence and invasion of privacy.

The complaint alleges Cruz "boasted that he had worked at the scene of the accident where Kobe Bryant had died" and showed photos of the crash site to a bartender and a bar patron on January 28, 2020, two days after the crash.

On the same day, Cruz also showed the photos of the Bryants' remains to his niece, according to the complaint.

The bartender who saw the photos then shared with other customers that he had seen the photos and "described specific characteristics of Mr. Bryant's remains," the complaint states.

One of the customers found this situation "very, very disturbing" and emailed a complaint to the sheriff's department, describing the deputy.

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Police earning the hate

Postby Shyster » Thu Mar 18, 2021 6:05 pm

Evidentiary Seizures Let Police Take Your Smartphone. They Don’t Have to Give It Back.
https://www.cato.org/blog/evidentiary-s ... ve-it-back
An attorney recounts how her client, the victim of a shooting, had his smartphone taken while he was unconscious in the hospital. An activist describes how his smartphone “vanished” during the Occupy Wall Street protests.

The perpetrator in these cases? The New York City Police Department.

The NYPD seized 55,511 cellphones last year, according to a disclosure report released yesterday. Most likely due to the pandemic, this number is actually markedly lower than the roughly 92,000 phones they seized in 2019. But another apparent consequence of the COVID era is that far fewer people jumped through the regulatory hoops necessary to get their phones back, meaning police kept nearly 40 percent of the phones taken in 2020.

What’s going on? Well, many police can legally take your personal belongings during the course of an interaction, and they don’t have to return them. I don’t mean “police can take your belongings if you are charged with a crime.” In New York, 85 percent of seizures aren’t related to any criminal charge at all. The NYPD is required to cite one of five justifications for taking your property, and, predictably, civil forfeiture and contraband are among the most common. But New York police also have the authority to take property under the pretense of seizing evidence pursuant to an investigation or arrest, and that property stays in the city’s possession even if no charges are ever brought. This is the pretext the NYPD has used to take phones from shooting victims, activists, and thousands of others within their jurisdiction.

Of course, this practice isn’t just limited to New York. For example, during the height of the Black Lives Matter movement last year, police in Richmond, VA conducted targeted seizures of smartphones from activists. But what makes New York’s system so interesting is that, following a class action lawsuit from the Bronx Defenders settled in 2018, we now know more about how the NYPD’s convoluted process of property seizures works—and how, ostensibly, people are supposed to get their property returned.

While the settlement agreement didn’t end the NYPD’s practice of seizing smartphones, it did curb a few of its worst excesses. For instance, the city previously required claimants to present two forms of ID in order to get their property back—even if police had seized the owner’s driver’s license. The settlement agreement puts strict limitations on seizure of driver’s licenses and cuts the ID requirement down to one.

Despite these changes, the process to get your property back once it’s been seized as evidence is still maddeningly difficult. First, you’ll need to hang on to the property voucher the NYPD is now required to provide you when they take your property. Then you’ll need to obtain a letter from the District Attorney authorizing the release of your items. And getting this letter isn’t easy: you’ll have to fill out a form from the DA’s office, which then has 15 days to respond. It’s only at this point that the DA has to identify some corresponding investigation or criminal proceeding in order to continue holding your property – but this still doesn’t require an actual charge. If the DA says no, you can request a review of the decision from another DA, or try again later. But if the DA says yes, then you can reclaim your property by presenting your voucher, the release form, and a valid ID to the NYPD property clerk.

The ease with which police can take your smartphone and the difficulties imposed to get it back are emblematic of why people are so mad at police: it’s one more way in which the state can inflict disproportionate harm on citizens while making a mockery of due process. As political philosophers from Locke to Rawls have recognized, citizens of a free society don’t willingly submit themselves to institutions that are inherently unfair and unjust. Allowing police to take people’s personal property subject only to the barest of restrictions undermines faith in a central pillar of government at a time when it’s already in decline.

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Police earning the hate

Postby Shyster » Fri Mar 19, 2021 8:20 pm

VIDEO: Body camera shows Duluth officer shooting man through door
The victim, 23-year-old Jared Fyle, can be heard screaming out in pain and yelling for the officer to stop before officer Tyler Leibfried fires two additional rounds.

https://www.duluthnewstribune.com/news/ ... rough-door


Two video clips filed in State District Court show the moment a Duluth police officer fired through the closed door of a downtown apartment unit, injuring an unarmed man inside.

The body camera clips were filed by St. Louis County Attorney Mark Rubin in response to a defense request to dismiss two felony firearm charges against Tyler Leibfried.

The video, as previously described in court documents, shows Leibfried and fellow officer Cory Lindsholm walking up to a third-floor unit at the Kingsley Heights Apartments on the night of Sept. 12, after they received a report of a possible domestic disturbance. They determined there was no cause for arrest but were planning to speak with the occupant, Jared Fyle.

Leibfried, trailed by Lindsholm, was approaching the door when two loud banging noises could be heard — something both officers later stated they believed to be gunshots. The videos show Leibfried ducking into a small alcove, with Lindsholm seeking cover down the hallway and around a corner.

Leibfried quickly calls out "shots fired" over the radio and retrieves his duty pistol as Lindsholm is heard yelling his name from down the hall. The video shows Leibfried pointing his gun at the door, which has no signs of damage, for several seconds before firing an initial volley of four shots — some 10 seconds after the initial banging noises were heard.

Fyle, who remains inside the apartment, can be heard screaming "Stop!" at least nine times, followed by an expression of "Ow!" Leibfried, after waiting 6 seconds, then fires an additional two rounds into the door as further screams are heard from Fyle and others in the building.

"Please! Stop!" Fyle is heard shouting. "Can I open the door? Stop! Ow! I got shot! Open the door! Open the door! Please! Stop!"

Leibfried is heard summoning medical attention for the victim as Lindsholm continues to call out his name. After several seconds, the officer is seen running down the hallway to his partner.

Leibfried and Lindsholm had not yet announced their presence when the incident started. An investigation suggested the initial gunshot-like sounds were probably from Fyle forcibly closing the apartment door, unaware the officers were about to arrive.

Fyle, 23, still has a bullet lodged in his back as a result of the incident. He has retained an attorney, who has not ruled out a lawsuit against the city.

Defense attorney Paul Engh argued Leibfried's charges should be dismissed because he was justified in firing the moment he heard apparent shots under the "reasonable officer" standard established by the U.S. Supreme Court.

But Rubin cited Leibfried's initial delay in firing, along with his decision to fire two additional rounds after Fyle could be heard screaming in pain. The prosecutor wrote that he used "poor judgment, fueled by fear."

So this cop is arguing that it was "reasonable" for him to dump four rounds through a closed door with absolutely no idea as to who may have been on the other side, and then fire two more shots after hearing Fyle screaming in pain that he'd been shot.

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Police earning the hate

Postby Shyster » Sat Mar 20, 2021 1:28 am

This officer has now murdered 4 people while at work. This one was unarmed and was 40ish yards away.


This officer was just fired, arrested, and charged with voluntary manslaughter.


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Police earning the hate

Postby MR25 » Mon Mar 22, 2021 10:01 am


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Police earning the hate

Postby count2infinity » Wed Mar 24, 2021 10:52 am



Such a great use of tax payers dollars... trying to catch freaking lyft and uber drivers giving people a ride when they claim they can't use the apps to get a ride.

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Police earning the hate

Postby nocera » Wed Mar 24, 2021 10:56 am

Lol that dude is a legend.

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Police earning the hate

Postby Shyster » Fri Mar 26, 2021 3:34 am

NYPD Under Fire For Alleged ‘Secret Subpoenas' Issued to Investigate Cops, Civilians
https://www.nbcnewyork.com/investigatio ... s/2958687/
Outrage is growing among civil rights advocates and even some current and former members of the NYPD after the department allegedly issued "secret subpoenas" to internet providers and private companies in order to obtain personal information on tens of thousands of people.

Internal documents obtained by the I-Team reveal that the department has issued well over 200,000 so called administrative subpoenas in the last decade. The NYPD has not said who exactly is being targeted, or why. The subpoenas were supposedly for "internal investigations."

Retired NYPD Officer Philip Insardi is taking direct aim at his former employer for looking into him. He was alerted to his secret subpoena by Microsoft, his internet provider, in 2017. The police department sought all of his emails from the subpoenas issued. Insardi said he was grateful Microsoft flagged him, but it hasn't lessened his fury.

"They've taken the law and they've thrown it out of the window," Insardi said. he added that he had no idea why he would be investigated by the department, and still has never been given an answer.

The subpoena noted an authorized investigation, and cited the U.S.A.'s anti-terrorist Patriot Act. Insardi, who retired in 1993, said using that law to go after him is an abuse of what the Patriot Act was designed for.

"The Patriot Act wasn't designed to go after a retired cop who goes tuna fishing. I've done nothing to be investigated by the Patriot Act," he said. "Absolutely shocking they were abusing, or are abusing, the Patriot Act to go after civilians."

The retired sergeant, who owned up to being critical of the department on social media, said he received no explanation from police internal affairs.

Jack Jaskaran is a retired NYPD captain and Harvard grad-turned-attorney. He filed a Freedom of Information request for Insardi's records and others, but said he has been stonewalled by the department.

"The NYPD is almost like a gestapo, where if you say something, watch your back," Jaskaran said. "It's a fishing expedition for them. They will issue these bogus subpoenas to get ahold of all your information — your text messages, your emails, your iCloud account."

In a document obtained by the I-Team, the department acknowledged issuing more than 217,000 administrative subpoenas from 2010 through the present. A current officer, who asked to remain anonymous in fear of retaliation, said the NYPD will "look through social media posts and go after people who disagree with them."

Lt. Edwin Raymond is the highest-ranking NYPD officer to openly criticize the department, including going public in 2016 about alleged racial quotas. He is running for city council and has an ongoing discrimination lawsuit against the city, and suspects the department targeted him too, and like those in his orbit.

"These are all reasons to spy," Raymond said. '"This is unvetted domestic espionage."

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Police earning the hate

Postby Shyster » Sat Mar 27, 2021 10:46 pm

New Video of Incident That Left An Officer Facing Charges
https://www.katc.com/news/st-landry-par ... ng-charges
New body camera and surveillance videos show the night an Opelousas man was allegedly beaten while handcuffed to a hospital bed by a now former Opelousas Police officer.

That former officer, Tyron Andrepont, is charged with five counts of malfeasance in connection to this case.

Jonah Coleman was the man in the hospital bed, and we now hear from Jonah's mother for the first time about what happened on the night she says her son was having a mental breakdown.

KATC was given the videos from someone closely connected to the case and we were able to verify their authenticity. The videos also mirror what a State Trooper says in a report to be the facts of this case.

It was around 11:30 p.m. on the night of October 30, 2019.

The female voice heard in the body cam video is Flora Coleman, saying, "He's mental. He has been in crisis for three days." She went on to tell officers her then 20-year-old son Jonah had seen his psychiatrist days before and had been taking all of his medication.

"He was scared of everything," she tells us. "Even the shower, he was scared of the water."

Flora can be heard in the video saying, "You are going to make me cry," to which Jonah replies, "I'm alright, momma."

Later in the video, you see Jonah walk himself to the ambulance, get inside, and lay back on the stretcher. He later gets up and exits the ambulance. Jonah then gets back inside and the medic allows him to sit in an upright seat. Jonah was taken to Opelousas General Hospital for an evaluation.

"We waited five hours and they wouldn't tell us anything," adds Flora. "We kept checking and they would only say, 'We are getting him situated.'"

Next comes video from inside the hospital. We're told that outside the door, a security guard and medical personnel try to get Jonah into the room and take him down to the ground, where he is handcuffed. Officer Tyron Andrepont, who is now facing charges in this case, comes in from the top of your screen.

Moments later, the handcuffed 20-year-old enters the room and sits on the bed. Andrepont speaks to Jonah, but the video has no audio.

At minute seven in the video, we see two medical professionals in the room, one security guard, and Andrepont. Jonah moves forward and a medical professional pushes him down. Jonah tries to sit up, and seconds later, he is struck in the face by Andrepont. At this point, Jonah is still handcuffed.

Jonah's mother says, "I watched him try and get out the bed and I asked him why. He said, 'Mom I was trying to see for you guys. They were hurting me.'"

As restraints are being put on Jonah's legs, the video shows Andrepont putting his right hand around Jonah's throat and pushing his head back. 18 seconds later, Andrepont regrips the throat. Jonah moves around as the officer's hand is still on his throat, a hand that was there for a total of one minute and 13 seconds.

"I blame them all," adds Flora. "They were all involved."

At 9 minutes and 51 seconds into this video, Officer Andrepont puts his right arm around Jonah's neck, with his left arm pulling the right. Another officer walks into the room and stands at the bedside. Jonah remains in this position when a person, who appears to be a security guard, removes the handcuffs, with Andrepont's hands still clinched together around Jonah's throat.

He releases the hold 30 seconds later; the handcuffs are not yet off.

Police body cam video from the same hospital room shows medical professionals restraining Jonah's left arm to the bed, while Andrepont has his right arm still in one handcuff and appears to be pulling the arm behind Jonah, extending his arm.

This is where the videos we obtained end.

Jonah's mother says after hours in the waiting room, she was then told her son was in critical care.

So a young man in who suffers from mental illness, was in a mental-health crisis, made no aggressive moves on anyone, and who was handcuffed at the time was punched and strangled by a police officer for more than a minute. And of course the cop is claiming that he "followed proper procedure." Given how many people suffering from mental crises end up dead when police arrive, Jonah Coleman is lucky that he wasn't hurt worse or killed.

Shyster
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Police earning the hate

Postby Shyster » Sun Mar 28, 2021 4:44 am

Outrage In Maryland Over Video Of Police Handcuffing 5-Year-Old


PFiDC
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Police earning the hate

Postby PFiDC » Sun Mar 28, 2021 3:40 pm

The screaming in his face is worse than the handcuffs IMO.

Shyster
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Police earning the hate

Postby Shyster » Sun Mar 28, 2021 6:50 pm

Agreed. I can't imagine what those cops were thinking (or they just weren't thinking). The child is five. I'm pretty sure that means he's in kindergarten. Jesus Christ, kids at that age are learning their colors, numbers, and letters, and those cops are screaming at him like he's some gangbanger they just picked up for selling meth.

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Police earning the hate

Postby Shyster » Thu Apr 01, 2021 11:17 pm

Salisbury officer accused of mistreating K-9 resigns before termination hearing\
https://www.wect.com/2021/03/31/salisbu ... n-hearing/
SALISBURY, N.C. (WBTV) - An internal investigation into the way Salisbury police officer James Hampton handled K-9 officer Zuul has been completed, according to Salisbury Police Chief Jerry Stokes.

...

The investigation began in early March after a video surfaced showing the officer and the four-year-old K-9 named Zuul training at the Mid-Carolina Regional Airport. In the video, Hampton can be seen getting out of a police vehicle, leaving the back door of the SUV open. The police dog jumps from the vehicle and tries to follow the officer, but immediately lies down when the Hampton yells at him.

The video, which was apparently shot months earlier, appeared to show Hampton lifting Zuul off the ground by his leash, swinging him around, slamming him against a patrol car, shoving him inside the patrol car, then striking him with his hand.

Voices on the video can be heard on the video. One says, “We’re good; no witnesses.” Then one asks, “Is your camera on?” and the response is “Uh, no, my power’s off.” Then someone says, “I think mine’s on,” followed by “Can you go flip my cameras off? Just the front camera.”

Hampton was hired by the Salisbury Police Department on August 5, 2013, was promoted twice, and has held the rank of Master Police Officer since November, 2019. Hampton has resigned from the Salisbury Police Department.

Cop violently slams a police dog against an SUV, shoves it, and punches it. He's now resigned before he can be fired. Attacking a police animal in North Carolina is a Class I felony punishable by 3-12 months in prison, but I expect this cop will be charged about the same time hell freezes over.

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Police earning the hate

Postby Freddy Rumsen » Fri Apr 02, 2021 8:50 am

This was big news on the BTV.

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