Police earning the hate

PFiDC
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Police earning the hate

Postby PFiDC » Thu Sep 24, 2020 12:14 pm

But had the man ever committed a crime?

MR25
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Police earning the hate

Postby MR25 » Thu Sep 24, 2020 12:43 pm


Shyster
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Police earning the hate

Postby Shyster » Sat Sep 26, 2020 6:53 pm

Salt Lake City finds ‘pattern of abuse’ when police use dogs to bite suspects
https://www.sltrib.com/news/2020/09/25/ ... ty-police/
After bodycam footage showed a Salt Lake City police officer ordering his dog to bite a Black man on his knees with his hands in the air, department officials launched a review of times when police dogs had been used during an arrest.

What they found, according to Mayor Erin Mendenhall, was a “pattern of abuse of power.”

Police Chief Mike Brown said Friday that his office reviewed 27 times where police dogs bit someone since 2018.

They flagged 18 of those cases — 66% — to the Salt Lake County District Attorney’s Office to be screened for criminal charges. The city’s civilian review board will also review, the chief said, as will the internal affairs department. The district attorney’s office says it will review all 27 cases.

The review highlights a failure within the police department’s reporting process that requires officers to report times when officers use force up the chain of command.

Neither the chief nor the mayor nor the district attorney were aware of the dog bite that sparked this review until The Salt Lake Tribune published the bodycam footage in August. That video shows an April encounter where Officer Nickolas Pearce ordered his dog Tuco to bite Jeffery Ryans, who was complying with the officers' orders.

The civilian review board found that city leaders didn’t know about the use of force because Pearce’s supervising lieutenant never reported it to upper management, as required by policy. That lieutenant has since retired, according to the board’s findings.

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Police earning the hate

Postby Shyster » Mon Sep 28, 2020 3:40 am

I Learned to Think Like a “Warrior Cop”
A course from a prominent police trainer taught me to treat neighborhoods like battlegrounds—and to always be ready to kill.

https://slate.com/news-and-politics/202 ... ology.html
You want to know the truth about the training? Take it from me, a proud holder of a certificate of completion from Grossman Academy: “On Combat” teaches its students to fear and resent the people they serve, to willfully mistake this contempt for bravery, and to believe that heroism is conferred by the barrel of a smoking gun. This philosophy, as manifested by the countless police officers and officials who subscribe to it, is and will continue to be one of the foremost impediments to meaningful efforts at police reform in towns across America. “If we do not keep the warrior in the mix, we become glorified social workers with guns,” Grossman says very early in “On Combat”—and even if that’s what the communities whose taxes pay their salaries want from their police officers, Grossman implies that it is those officers’ patriotic duty to resist.

Pavel Bure
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Police earning the hate

Postby Pavel Bure » Mon Sep 28, 2020 1:13 pm

If you’ve never listened to “Behind the Bastards” this is as good a place as any to start. This dadhole who has never seen combat teaches “killology” and his philosophy of sheep, wolves, and sheep dogs as it relates to people.
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tifosi77
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Police earning the hate

Postby tifosi77 » Mon Sep 28, 2020 1:34 pm

One thing that I want to make clear: Policing is not combat. Even when push comes to shove and you're sending a fully armed battalion to remind the people of your love, it's not the same thing, and I think it's absolutely toxic to approach the job with that mentality. The whole notion of the 'warrior cop' is ruinous.

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Police earning the hate

Postby Jim » Mon Sep 28, 2020 2:42 pm

Just enforces my "schoolyard bullies with a piece of tin on their chest" concept.

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Police earning the hate

Postby AuthorTony » Mon Sep 28, 2020 5:53 pm

https://www.nbcnews.com/news/crime-cour ... h-n1241266
A Texas sheriff who starred on the controversial reality show “Live PD” was arrested Monday on evidence tampering charges in the case of a Black man who died in police custody.

Williamson County Sheriff Robert Chody is accused of destroying or concealing audio and video footage that showed his deputies pursuing and using force on Javier Ambler, 40, in March 2019, according to an indictment.

The footage was captured by Live PD cameras on the night that Ambler, a former postal worker and the father of two, died following a 22-minute car chase by Williamson County deputies.

Ambler’s death – and the questions over the destroyed "Live PD" footage – ignited a controversy that led to the cancellation of the hit A&E show in June.

Former Williamson County general counsel Jason Nassour is also accused of destroying the recordings “with intent to impair their ability as evidence” in the investigation of Ambler’s death.

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Police earning the hate

Postby Shyster » Tue Sep 29, 2020 5:40 pm

California sheriff's deputies say they didn't know it was illegal to lie about evidence on police reports: report
https://www.foxnews.com/us/california-s ... ce-reports
Two former Orange County sheriff’s deputies told a California grand jury they did not know it was against the law to falsify police documents, an offense that led to their firing and conviction amid a widespread department “evidence scandal” that came to light last year, according to a local report.

Bryce Richmond Simpson, 31, and Joseph Anthony Atkinson Jr., 39, testified to a grand jury on Sept. 21 that they were never told it was illegal to write in police reports that they had submitted evidence when they actually had not, the Orange County Register recently reported, citing transcripts of their testimony. Deputies were typically expected to submit evidence by the end of their workdays.

Simpson and Atkinson Jr. were two of the most prominent and – according to the report – the worst of the OCSD members involved in the “evidence scandal,” which came to light in November 2019, according to the Register, which was first to break the news.

They were allegedly two of at least 17 deputies investigated for potential charges for allegedly claiming in reports that they had booked evidence, as required, but failing to do so sometimes until months later, if at all, according to multiple reports.

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Police earning the hate

Postby Shyster » Tue Oct 06, 2020 4:50 pm

Jonathan Price Allegedly Tried to Break Up a Fight. Texas Police Killed Him
Officer Shaun Lucas has been charged with murder, the Texas Rangers said in a statement


https://www.rollingstone.com/culture/cu ... s-1071219/

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Police earning the hate

Postby Shyster » Tue Oct 06, 2020 8:58 pm

One of the most cruel and sadistic acts I've posted here to date:

Former detention officers accused of playing ‘Baby Shark’ song repeatedly to punish inmates
https://www.wtae.com/article/former-det ... s/34292064
OKLAHOMA CITY — Two former Oklahoma County detention officers are facing charges after being accused of punishing several inmates by forcing them to stand for extended periods of time and to listen to the popular children’s song “Baby Shark” loudly and repeatedly, according to court documents.

According to court documents filed Monday in the Oklahoma County District Court, former detention officers Christian Charles Miles and Gregory Cornell Butler Jr., along with their supervisor at the time, Christopher Raymond Hendershott, are charged with multiple counts, including cruelty to a prisoner.

The men were working at the Oklahoma County Sheriff’s Office during the incidents, which happened in November and December in 2019. At least four inmates were involved, according to court documents.

Court documents stated that on several occasions, Butler and Miles removed the inmates from their jail cells, handcuffed them to a wall in a standing position for extended periods of time, while at the same time, playing music loudly.

Miles was interviewed and he confirmed that he and Butler systematically worked together and used the benches, bars and attorney booth as a means to discipline the inmates and, “teach them a lesson,” because they felt that disciplinary action within the detention center was not working in correcting the inmates’ behavior. Butler also confirmed that he used the booth as a means of punishment.

"It was unfortunate that I could not find a felony statute to fit this fact scenario,” Oklahoma County District Attorney David Prater said. “I would have preferred filing a felony on this behavior.”

PFiDC
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Police earning the hate

Postby PFiDC » Tue Oct 06, 2020 10:27 pm

I have still never heard one single note of that song...

Shyster
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Police earning the hate

Postby Shyster » Thu Oct 08, 2020 7:29 pm

Apparently jaywalking is grounds to tase and arrest someone.


Shyster
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Police earning the hate

Postby Shyster » Fri Oct 09, 2020 3:34 pm

A Month Before Louisville Drug Warriors Killed Breonna Taylor, They Knew the 'Suspicious Packages' She Supposedly Was Receiving Came From Amazon
https://reason.com/2020/10/09/a-month-b ... om-amazon/
Even after Breonna Taylor broke up with Jamarcus Glover, he continued to receive packages at her apartment in Louisville, Kentucky. That arrangement had lethal consequences, because it was the main justification for the reckless, fruitless March 13 drug raid that killed Taylor, an unarmed 26-year-old EMT with no criminal record.

Police obtained the no-knock warrant to search Taylor's apartment by suggesting that Glover, who was arrested for drug dealing that same night, had been stashing "narcotics and/or proceeds from the sale of narcotics" there. But according to newly released transcripts of interviews with Louisville police officers, they knew a month before they invaded Taylor's home that Glover's packages contained neither of those things.

The interviews, conducted as part of an internal investigation after the raid, reveal that Joshua Jaynes, the detective who obtained the search warrant that proved to be Taylor's death warrant, learned in early February that there was nothing suspicious about the packages that Glover had delivered at her apartment, which came from Amazon. Jaynes nevertheless used those packages to imply that she was involved in Glover's illegal activity, which Glover insists is not true.

. . .

Jaynes not only misrepresented those packages as evidence of Taylor's complicity. As Balko has noted, the detective offered no evidence specific to her that would justify a no-knock warrant. He simply cut-and-pasted boilerplate about the risk of violent resistance and/or evidence destruction in drug cases, which the Supreme Court has said is not enough to justify dispensing with the usual knock-and-announce rule.

"There was clearly no probable cause to believe drugs were being dealt from her apartment, and no probable cause that Breonna or her boyfriend [Kenneth Walker] were doing anything illegal," says Daniel Klein, a former Albuquerque police sergeant who writes about law enforcement issues, in an email. "Yet the assistant district attorney and the [circuit] court judge not only approved the warrant…they approved it to be a no-knock warrant executed in the middle of the night!"

Lonita Baker, an attorney representing Taylor's family, notes other discrepancies in Jaynes' warrant applications, including an incorrect description of the car that Taylor was driving at the time and the erroneous attribution of Taylor's cellphone number to Glover. Those mistakes, she told the NBC station in Louisville, reflect "the sloppiness of the entire investigation." Baker said it was "disappointing" that Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron, who investigated the raid itself, did not also look at the justification for the warrant, which Cameron said the FBI is investigating.

MR25
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Police earning the hate

Postby MR25 » Fri Oct 09, 2020 3:37 pm

They're trying reeeeeeally hard to justify shooting her.

PFiDC
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Police earning the hate

Postby PFiDC » Fri Oct 09, 2020 3:39 pm

Does holding a gun or taser sideways like that have any benefit? I legitimately don't know.

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Police earning the hate

Postby Shyster » Fri Oct 16, 2020 3:19 pm

North Carolina Mother Sues School Resource Officer Who Handcuffed and Pinned Her 7-Year-Old Autistic Son
https://reason.com/2020/10/16/north-car ... tistic-son
A North Carolina mother filed a civil rights lawsuit last Friday against a policeman who handcuffed and held her autistic 7-year-old son prone on the ground for nearly 40 minutes.

Body camera footage of the September 2018 incident, first published by WSOC-TV, shows former Statesville, North Carolina, school resource officer Michael Fattaleh pulling the child's arms behind his back and handcuffing him.

According to the lawsuit, the boy, who is identified only by the initial L.G., had been diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder the previous year and placed in a special needs classroom. On September 11, 2018, L.G. became overwhelmed and began acting out and spitting in class. He was taken to a "quiet room" to calm down when Fattaleh allegedly walked by and saw the boy spit on the ground. Fattaleh handcuffed L.G.'s hands behind his back and restrained him stomach-down on the floor.

Staff placed a pillow underneath L.G.'s head, and Fatalleh asked him several times if he could breath and if he was comfortable. But he also appeared to taunt L.G. at times.

"If you, my friend, are not acquainted with the juvenile justice system, you will be very shortly," Fattaleh says at one point in the body camera footage. "You ever been charged with a crime before? Well, you're fixing to be."

At another point, Fattaleh puts his knee on L.G's back and says, "Have you ever heard the term 'babysitter?' I take that term literally, my friend."

L.G.'s mother, who is also not named in the lawsuit, arrived to pick him up. Fatalleh told her L.G. was facing one to two counts of assault. The boy was not charged, and Fatalleh resigned from the department shortly after the incident.

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Police earning the hate

Postby Shyster » Sat Oct 17, 2020 5:19 pm

A headline that shouldn't surprise anyone who's heard of the Blue Code of Silence.

LAPD data show few officers report excessive force by peers; better tracking promised
https://www.latimes.com/california/stor ... n-the-past
With a new state law requiring police officers to report excessive force by their peers, a Los Angeles police commissioner this summer asked department commanders how many times such reporting had occurred in the last five years.

The answer that Dale Bonner got back, in a July email obtained by The Times through a public records request, was five. When The Times asked for a synopsis of the five incidents, LAPD officials said that the number was actually two.

Amid thousands of unauthorized force complaints from the public since 2015, there were only two documented instances in which an officer had filed an unauthorized force complaint against another officer, they said. Both were in 2016.

In one, an officer reported seeing another yank a handcuffed detainee backward off a bench onto the floor, leading to the offending officer receiving a 10-day suspension and demotion. In the other, an officer reported being in a vehicle with two supervisors when one activated a personal stun gun and the other pulled out a handgun. The first supervisor received a 12-day suspension, the second a 22-day suspension.

From 2017 to 2019, the Los Angeles Police Department fielded more than 2,200 unauthorized force complaints against officers. Not a single one was recorded as having been filed by a fellow officer, according to department records.

There also have not been any recorded cases of officers filing excessive force complaints so far this year, despite members of the public filing more than 50 such complaints over their treatment by officers at massive protests in the city this summer.

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Police earning the hate

Postby Shyster » Sat Oct 17, 2020 5:21 pm

Sheriff fires two jail administrators after inmate gave birth in cell
https://www.sun-sentinel.com/local/brow ... story.html
A Broward inmate screaming for help in her jail cell was forced to give birth there, ignored by jail staff standing outside her cell until just before her son was born, according to the Broward Public Defender’s Office.

Broward Sheriff Gregory Tony fired two top-level jail administrators Thursday, barely 24 hours after learning of the incident.

“I conducted a review of the matter and determined that command level failures occurred by Colonel [Gary] Palmer and Lieutenant Colonel [Angela] Neely in this case,” Sheriff Tony said in a news release announcing the terminations. “They grossly failed this agency and this inmate.”

The mentally ill woman gave birth on Sept. 27, nearly three months after the state enacted the Tammy Jackson Healthy Pregnancies for Incarcerated Women law, which puts safeguards in place preventing pregnant women being in restrictive or isolated cells during their detention.

Jackson had her baby alone in a jail cell in April 2019, drawing outrage from Public Defender Howard FInkelstein and inspiring the new law, which passed both through the state Legislature unanimously in March.

Pavel Bure
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Police earning the hate

Postby Pavel Bure » Sat Oct 17, 2020 8:57 pm

A headline that shouldn't surprise anyone who's heard of the Blue Code of Silence.

LAPD data show few officers report excessive force by peers; better tracking promised
https://www.latimes.com/california/stor ... n-the-past
With a new state law requiring police officers to report excessive force by their peers, a Los Angeles police commissioner this summer asked department commanders how many times such reporting had occurred in the last five years.

The answer that Dale Bonner got back, in a July email obtained by The Times through a public records request, was five. When The Times asked for a synopsis of the five incidents, LAPD officials said that the number was actually two.

Amid thousands of unauthorized force complaints from the public since 2015, there were only two documented instances in which an officer had filed an unauthorized force complaint against another officer, they said. Both were in 2016.

In one, an officer reported seeing another yank a handcuffed detainee backward off a bench onto the floor, leading to the offending officer receiving a 10-day suspension and demotion. In the other, an officer reported being in a vehicle with two supervisors when one activated a personal stun gun and the other pulled out a handgun. The first supervisor received a 12-day suspension, the second a 22-day suspension.

From 2017 to 2019, the Los Angeles Police Department fielded more than 2,200 unauthorized force complaints against officers. Not a single one was recorded as having been filed by a fellow officer, according to department records.

There also have not been any recorded cases of officers filing excessive force complaints so far this year, despite members of the public filing more than 50 such complaints over their treatment by officers at massive protests in the city this summer.
This is one of the biggest issues. It’s either followed like dogma or followed because reporting puts you, your family, and your career in jeopardy. Law enforcement that do report tend to not last long, especially when the “investigations” are usually done by the people that enable the behavior.
.
John punches an old lady in the face which is completely wrong.
Jim wants to report this.
Policy says to report the incident to John directly.
John takes the complaint and finds he did nothing wrong.
John now finds that Jim is “underperforming”
Jim is fired.

Shyster
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Police earning the hate

Postby Shyster » Sun Oct 18, 2020 6:45 pm

Sheriff’s Department defied court orders to name deputies with histories of misconduct. It was a costly decision
https://www.latimes.com/california/stor ... misconduct
On three occasions, a judge ordered the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department to produce a roster of deputies with histories of misconduct.

Court deadlines came and went. Tens of thousands of dollars in sanctions against the county piled up.

But the list was never disclosed.

Janet Williams had requested the so-called Brady list in a 2017 civil rights lawsuit after a deputy shot and killed her son, Dennis “Todd” Rogers, 41. She hoped the list would show the department failed to provide proper training and supervision to deputies, leading to excessive force.

But she never got that far. After the Sheriff’s Department repeatedly failed to provide the list to Williams, U.S. District Court Judge André Birotte Jr. granted a default judgment in her favor of more than $2 million.

“Defendants have committed serious, inexcusable discovery abuses and have violated repeated court orders, thereby engaging in culpable conduct that led to their default,” Birotte, who formerly served as the U.S. Attorney for the Los Angeles region, wrote in his Sept. 25 ruling.

The decision comes as the Sheriff’s Department faces mounting criticism for resisting disclosure of information about deputies with histories of misconduct and retreating from other reforms — claims it has strongly refuted.

It has been sued by organizations including the American Civil Liberties Union and the Los Angeles Times over a new transparency law that allows the public to see records of confirmed cases of lying and sexual assault by officers, as well as shootings and major uses of force. (L.A. County Sheriff Alex Villanueva has attributed delays in compliance to limited staffing and lack of funding, saying the department is “more transparent than ever before.”)

During Villanueva’s tenure, the county’s Office of Inspector General has reported that officials have inactivated internal personnel investigations at a high rate, with many cancellations not meeting the department’s standards for closing an investigation. A Superior Court judge recently found that Villanueva had unlawfully rehired a deputy who had been fired by his predecessor, Sheriff Jim McDonnell, after domestic violence allegations. (Villanueva has said the deputy was denied due process.)

...

Priscilla Ocen, a member of the sheriff Civilian Oversight Commission, said the judgment illustrates how “time and time again” the Sheriff’s Department has blocked transparency about deputies alleged to have committed misconduct and those with a history of bad behavior.

“They would rather pay $2 million than turn over a list, which I think the people have a right to have, especially people who are litigating over the practices and policies of the Sheriff’s Department as it relates to excessive force,” she said.

Sean Kennedy, another commissioner, said that “hiding information about deputy misconduct has become more important to them than complying with the law.”

“When a federal judge grants a $2 million default judgment against the LASD for refusing to comply with court orders to produce the Brady list, it’s a red flag of serious transparency problems within the Department,” he said in a statement.

Shyster
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Police earning the hate

Postby Shyster » Sun Oct 18, 2020 6:48 pm

Fatal police shootings of mentally ill people are 39 percent more likely to take place in small and midsized areas
https://www.washingtonpost.com/national ... story.html
The final moments of Stacy Kenny’s life are captured on a recorded 911 call. Kenny, who had been diagnosed with paranoid schizophrenia, begs an emergency operator to explain why she’s been pulled over. Amid screaming and rustling sounds, police officers smash the windows on her red Nissan, Taser her twice, punch her in the face more than a dozen times and try to pull her out by her hair.

But Kenny, 33, who legally had changed her gender but still appeared to be a man, was anchored to the car by a locked seat belt. Her life ends, as does the 911 call, when she tries to flee by driving away with one of the officers still inside the car. There’s a burst of gunfire, then an officer says: “We are all okay. Bad guy down.”

The 2019 death in Springfield, Ore., was one of 1,324 fatal shootings by police over the past six years that involved someone police said was in the throes of a mental health crisis — about a quarter of all fatal police shootings during that period, according to a Washington Post database.

Although the number of these fatalities has declined, these confrontations remain a deadly and vexing issue, especially in small and midsize metropolitan areas. A Post analysis shows fatal police shootings of those who are mentally ill are more likely to take place in areas with populations of fewer than 1 million, like Springfield, which is part of a metropolitan area of about 382,000.

The Post reviewed the number of mentally ill people killed by police over the past six years and compared it with the overall number of people living in the area to determine the per capita rate. Such shootings are 39 percent more likely in small and medium-size areas than in large metropolitan areas or rural areas.

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Police earning the hate

Postby dodint » Sun Oct 18, 2020 6:49 pm

As an aside, I *love* reading about discovery sanctions for some reason. So thanks for that.

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Police earning the hate

Postby dodint » Sun Oct 18, 2020 6:51 pm

Also, bonus points for shaf. The person killed was a mentally ill trans.

Something for everyone!

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Police earning the hate

Postby Shyster » Sun Oct 18, 2020 6:51 pm

Dozens of State Police troopers remain on the force despite past illegal conduct
https://www.bostonglobe.com/2020/10/17/ ... l-conduct/
One Massachusetts State Police captain, alcohol on his breath and an open beer bottle rattling around his unmarked cruiser, led Saugus police on a chase and had to be wrestled to the ground and handcuffed.

Another trooper was caught providing unauthorized police escorts for funeral processions and taking cash under the table, while also routinely skipping portions of detail and overtime shifts for which he was paid.

And then there is the trooper duo — academy classmates and close friends — who regularly hung out with known criminals. One trooper traveled and partied in Las Vegas with people tied to organized crime, coming under federal scrutiny after he admitted he improperly ran background checks on behalf of drug dealers linked to an illegal gambling operation.

All of these troopers are on patrol today, having escaped termination from the state’s largest law enforcement agency despite crimes or serious misconduct.

A Globe review of the department’s internal affairs files shows the agency rarely fires troopers almost no matter what they have done. The Globe found only a handful of examples of firings in the last decade.

Meanwhile, dozens of troopers found by internal investigators to have broken the law remain on the force today. They collectively have 29 sustained charges for assault and battery; 19 alcohol and drug violations, including four OUIs; 17 charges for harassment, including three for sexual harassment; another 17 for improperly using the state’s criminal background check system.

The department levied nine violations for lying, including to internal investigators or judges; eight cases of excessive force; seven for illegal searches; and four sustained false arrest charges. A sustained charge is one the department has investigated and confirmed.

A reminder: These are troopers still on active duty, charged with enforcing the law on the rest of us.

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