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Shyster
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Postby Shyster » Wed Nov 27, 2019 3:55 pm

A fuel-truck driver had a Really Bad Day at Dallas-Fort Worth and managed to hit two different American Eagle CRJ-900s.


Freddy Rumsen
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Postby Freddy Rumsen » Sat Nov 30, 2019 10:35 pm


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Postby shafnutz05 » Sun Dec 01, 2019 7:02 am

Awful. Conditions were terrible out there.

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Postby Shyster » Mon Dec 02, 2019 3:47 pm

I'll be interested to see what happened in that South Dakota crash. The weather was bad, and it was carrying a max pax load, but depending on fuel weight the aircraft should have still been within weight limits. The aircraft was a Pilatus PC-12, which is the world's best-selling single-engine turboprop. It may only have a single engine (albeit one that produces more than 1,000 hp), but the PC-12 is a large and highly capable general-aviation aircraft that seats up to 12 pax, comes equipped with a full suite of electronics, including a three-axis autopilot, and comes with anti-icing systems. It's also known for being relatively stable and easy to fly. It's used all over the world for air-ambulance and medivac roles, and it's even capable of landing on grass and unimproved airstrips. One of the major operators of the type is the Royal Flying Doctor Service of Australia, for example. It's actually the aircraft that would be at the top of my "If I ever won the Powerball" wish list.

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Postby Shyster » Mon Dec 02, 2019 3:54 pm

Evacuation slide from airplane falls in Milton front yard
https://www.boston25news.com/news/evacu ... 1014535831
The pilot of Delta Air Lines Flight 405, a Boeing 767, reported a loud noise as the aircraft was on approach to Boston Logan International Airport shortly before noon today. Workers inspected the aircraft after landing and discovered that the right rear evacuation slide was missing.

The Milton Police Department in Massachusetts notified the FAA that they found the slide in the backyard of a residence. No injuries or ground damage were reported to the FAA, which is investigating.

The flight arrived from Charles De Gaulle Airport in Paris.
I was scratching my head as to how this could happen, because the emergency slides are usually covered by the doors, but the folks over at airliners.net are saying that the slide was a wing slide. Today I learned that the 767 has inflatable slides in compartments in the wings so that people who use the over-wing emergency exits can slide from the wing to the ground. One of those compartments must have come open in flight. It's a good thing no one on the ground was hurt.

Found a video:


NTP66
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Postby NTP66 » Tue Dec 03, 2019 10:10 am

I guess they forgot to de-age the plane...

Image

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Postby Shyster » Tue Dec 03, 2019 3:26 pm

Speaking of flat panels, Garmin is introducing a new "Autonomí" emergency autoland feature for its G3000 touchscreen avionics system. The system is designed to deal with the issue of incapacitated pilots, especially for single-pilot operations, and it would also kick in in situations were hypoxia might be affecting both pilots, such as the tragic 1999 Payne Stewart crash where the Learjet lost cabin pressure and everyone aboard was incapacitated due to lack of oxygen. The G3000 will select a suitable nearby field for landing (taking runway size, wind, and weather into account), squawk an emergency on the transponder, communicate the emergency to ATC, configure the aircraft for landing (including lowering the gear and flaps), execute an autonomous GPS approach and landing, brake to a halt, and shut down the engine. The system will activate automatically if it senses a lack of input from the pilot for more than 15 minutes and the pilot then fails to respond to queries. Passengers can also activate the system with the press of a button.



This system will require a lot of integration with aircraft systems (such as the brakes and landing gear), so it may take some effort to fit, and it's going to be really expensive at first, but I can see this sort of system becoming very common in the future. The first aircraft to have this system available will be the Piper M600 turboprop and the Cirrus Vision SF50 light jet.

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Postby Freddy Rumsen » Mon Dec 09, 2019 10:00 pm


Tomas
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Postby Tomas » Wed Dec 11, 2019 4:14 pm

I didn't spend six years in National Medical School to be called "regional," thank you very much!

https://www.fayettevilleflyer.com/2019/ ... l-airport/

(It's one of the most expensive airports in the country - and THIS is what needs to be fixed? :D )

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Postby tifosi77 » Tue Dec 17, 2019 1:46 pm

TIL Boeing is a Chicago-based company, and they are suspending production on the 737Max next month. That's not good news.

In other, much cooler news:

NASA’s X-59 Quiet Supersonic Research Aircraft Cleared for Final Assembly
NASA’s first large scale, piloted X-plane in more than three decades is cleared for final assembly and integration of its systems following a major project review by senior managers held Thursday at NASA Headquarters in Washington.

The management review, known as Key Decision Point-D (KDP-D), was the last programmatic hurdle for the X-59 Quiet SuperSonic Technology (QueSST) aircraft to clear before officials meet again in late 2020 to approve the airplane’s first flight in 2021.

“With the completion of KDP-D we’ve shown the project is on schedule, it’s well planned and on track. We have everything in place to continue this historic research mission for the nation’s air-traveling public,” said Bob Pearce, NASA’s associate administrator for Aeronautics.

The X-59 is shaped to reduce the loudness of a sonic boom reaching the ground to that of a gentle thump, if it is heard at all. It will be flown above select U.S. communities to generate data from sensors and people on the ground in order to gauge public perception. That data will help regulators establish new rules to enable commercial supersonic air travel over land.
It has always been kind of a weird thing to me that supersonic air travel has never really been pursued with much alacrity.

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Postby NTP66 » Tue Dec 17, 2019 1:49 pm

Re-certification is apparently scheduled for February 2020, so it's not the end of the road for the Max, currently.

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Postby Freddy Rumsen » Wed Dec 18, 2019 10:31 pm


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Postby NTP66 » Tue Jan 14, 2020 5:32 pm



How the **** does this even happen? Obligatory "DL hates children", too.

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Postby Freddy Rumsen » Tue Jan 14, 2020 5:34 pm

This is worse than Dave Matthews

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Postby tifosi77 » Tue Jan 14, 2020 5:36 pm

CSB, that video looks like it was shot from the office building I worked in for a couple years. Square Enix is on the top floor. Yaaay.

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Postby NTP66 » Tue Jan 14, 2020 5:38 pm

****, didn't realize I left out some pertinent details:


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Postby tifosi77 » Tue Jan 14, 2020 5:56 pm

Haha, I just looked at the flightpath on FlightRadar24... track went directly over my house.

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Postby NTP66 » Tue Jan 14, 2020 6:55 pm

60 people affected now.
The most heavily affected school was Park Avenue Elementary in Cudahy, where 20 children and 11 adults reported minor injuries. The school is about 19 miles east of the airport.

The other schools affected were San Gabriel Elementary, Graham Elementary, Tweedy Elementary, 93rd Street Elementary and Jordan High School.

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Postby Shyster » Tue Jan 14, 2020 8:04 pm

How the **** does this even happen? Obligatory "DL hates children", too.
Aircraft was a 777-200 headed to Shanghai, so lots of fuel on board. There was an engine failure, so it needed to get back on the ground ASAP. It would have been way overweight for landing, so it needed to dump some fuel. Ideally, fuel dumping is done at higher altitudes (where it vaporizes before hitting the ground) and over unpopulated areas, but in this case it looks like the pilots thought they needed to get lighter fast.

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Postby NTP66 » Tue Jan 14, 2020 8:09 pm

How the **** does this even happen? Obligatory "DL hates children", too.
Aircraft was a 777-200 headed to Shanghai, so lots of fuel on board. There was an engine failure, so it needed to get back on the ground ASAP. It would have been way overweight for landing, so it needed to dump some fuel. Ideally, fuel dumping is done at higher altitudes (where it vaporizes before hitting the ground) and over unpopulated areas, but in this case it looks like the pilots thought they needed to get lighter fast.
I know, but I thought ATC is there to better assist where this actually happens?

Also:


"All video footage I have seen shows DAL89 dumping while on the localizer. Even though we didn't hear them request fuel dump, they might have requested that on 124.9 which we didn't happen to record - or maybe not and dumped by themselves."

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Postby Shyster » Tue Jan 14, 2020 8:29 pm

I know, but I thought ATC is there to better assist where this actually happens?
Usually, yeah. From the audio, it sounds like at first they didn't think fuel would be a problem. Maybe at the last minute they realized they would be heavier than they thought and decided to just start dumping on the approach.

Not sure what sort of repercussions there would be for the crew. Generally, when an aircraft has declared an emergency, the rules mostly go out the window in favor of "Do whatever you gotta' do to get on the ground safely."

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Postby tifosi77 » Wed Jan 15, 2020 3:06 pm

It is possible they got vectored into the approach pattern a bit more quickly than anticipated (I think normal procedures for a non-critical emergency allow for something like a 15 minute fuel burn, which itself might not be enough to reduce weight in this instance since they were effectively only burning fuel with one engine), and found themselves several thousand pounds overweight and decided to dump rather than conduct an overweight landing.

There's no word yet as to when they commenced the dump-ex or when they shut it down, but video shows that they traveled at least a couple miles at low altitude (2,000' AGL, thereabouts) over a densely-populated urban area spewing JP-whatever.


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Postby Shyster » Fri Jan 24, 2020 8:01 pm

Boeing attempted the first flight of the 777X earlier today, but unfortunately it had to be scrubbed due to weather. For safety reasons, maiden flights from Paine Field have to take off to the north so they head out over the water and away from populated areas. There was a strong and gusty northerly wind, that exceeded the acceptable amount of tailwind for pretty much any aircraft to take off in that direction, let alone one on its first flight. Weather in Seattle has been stormy, so it's not clear when the next attempt will be.

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Postby Shyster » Mon Jan 27, 2020 2:56 pm

Boeing completed the successful first flight of the 777X over the weekend. The four-hour or so flight took off from Paine Field in Everett and landed at Boeing Field in Seattle. This test model will be joined by three more for thousands of flight hours over the upcoming months. Assuming no significant problems arise, deliveries could start in later summer or so, and I think Emirates will be the launch customer.

It remains to be seen how popular the 777X will be. There are only a little more than 300 orders at the moment, and the vast majority come from the Middle East 3 airlines (Emirates, Qatar, Etihad), who have been running into their own financial problems. The widebody market also seems to be shifting smaller, with the sweet spot for sales now being the size of the 787-9 and A350-900. Still, there are more than 1,6000 777s in service, and the bulk of those are the 777-300ER model, which was only introduced in 2004. Long-range widebodies generally have longer lifespans that other jets, and most of those 777-300ERs are nowhere near retirement age. Whether the 777X becomes a success will I think depend upon whether it captures the replacement market for those existing ERs.


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Postby Shyster » Thu Feb 06, 2020 7:51 pm

More details coming in on the Pegasus Airlines Boeing 737 that skidded off a runway and broke up while landing at Istanbul's Sabiha Gokcen airport on Wednesday. The aircraft went off the end of the runway at over 60 knots, fell down a steep embankment, and broke into at least three pieces. There were three fatalities and more than 100 injuries, many of them severe.

https://www.cnn.com/2020/02/05/europe/t ... index.html

Unfortunately, this is looking like a case of major pilot error compounded by bad weather. There was a thunderstorm directly over the field, and the runway was soaking wet. The aircraft was landing with at least a 14-knot tailwind, and that's not counting wind gusts, which were over 30 knots. The maximum tailwind for commercial jets landing on a completely dry runway is usually 10 knots, and that lowers to five knots for a wet runway. The airport was just about to reverse its traffic pattern and start takeoff/landing in the opposite direction. The 737 was also too fast and high on approach and didn't touch down until it was almost 2/3 of the way down the runway. There wasn't anywhere near enough runway remaining for that jet to stop. Ultimately, there were at least four reasons for aborting the approach or executing a go-around (i.e. heavy rain, tailwind, unstabilized approach, long landing), but the crew never did so.

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