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Postby shafnutz05 » Sat Jul 18, 2020 7:00 am

ISS pretty much directly overhead tonight. Nice nite. How can you get a closer look? My binoculars didn't do sht
It’ll be moving somewhat quickly. Hard to trace with hand magnification
Yup. Honestly it's hard enough to stay focused on deep sky objects with a telescope because of their slow march across the sky. Nigh impossible with something like the ISS.

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Postby mac5155 » Sat Jul 18, 2020 10:13 pm

Found my first planet!

Image

Jupiter and 3 (the telescope shows 4) moons. Snapped this with my cell phone thru the view finder.

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Postby mac5155 » Sat Jul 18, 2020 10:23 pm

.
Last edited by mac5155 on Sat Jul 18, 2020 10:24 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Postby mac5155 » Sat Jul 18, 2020 10:24 pm

And I'm fairly sure that this is saturn.

Image

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Postby shafnutz05 » Sat Jul 18, 2020 10:29 pm

Nice!

For those of you with a somewhat clear view to the NNW, Comet Neowise is extremely visible with the naked eye right now. Just caught it for the first time tonight, you can clearly make out the tail and everything. Reminds me of Hale Bopp in the 90s. It will only be visible for another week or two, highly recommend getting to a spot you can see it.

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Postby Ad@m » Sat Jul 18, 2020 10:48 pm

How to see five planets and the moon without a telescope on Sunday

https://www.cnet.com/how-to/how-to-see- ... on-sunday/
"Step outside early in the morning, at least an hour before sunrise," Hunt said. "Find the four bright planets -- Venus, Mars, Saturn and Jupiter. They look like overly bright stars. Brilliant Venus is low in the east-northeast. Mars is the lone 'star' in the southeast, and Jupiter and Saturn are the stars in the southwest. To your eyes, they won't look like the photos made by spacecraft, just overly bright stars."

Mercury might be the toughest to spot. Hunt advises trying for Mercury about 45 minutes before sunrise, using binoculars.

On his website, Hunt offers tips for finding each planet. Venus, he says, will "blaze in the eastern sky." The thin crescent moon will be very low in the east-northeast part of the sky, and will only be about 1 percent illuminated. Mercury will be to the right of the moon, Mars will be about halfway up in the sky in the south-southeast, Jupiter will be just above the horizon in the southwest, and Saturn will be to the upper left of Jupiter.

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Postby mac5155 » Sat Jul 18, 2020 10:48 pm

Yeah I am pretty bummed that NNW is like the only direction I don't have a good view. I could go for a 5 minute hike but...

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Postby mac5155 » Sat Jul 18, 2020 10:50 pm

I'll just catch it next time. :lol:

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Postby RonnieFranchise » Sat Jul 18, 2020 10:59 pm

Every night big dipper’s been clear but cloudy to the north so not much beyond it here

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Postby Ad@m » Sat Jul 18, 2020 11:07 pm

Jupiter gives us Pluto in 2020

https://earthsky.org/astronomy-essentia ... -night-sky
This year, very bright Jupiter and very faint Pluto will remain near each other throughout the year, closely aligned in front of the constellation Sagittarius. Pluto requires a telescope to be seen. No telescope? Try NASA’s Night Sky Network to find star parties and/or astronomy clubs near you.

And you don’t need a telescope to use your imagination. Throughout 2020, dazzling Jupiter will enable us to envision Pluto with the mind’s eye on the sky’s dome. First find Jupiter and – presto – you’ve nearly stumbled upon Pluto. Just remember, Jupiter outshines Pluto by several million times.

Where are these worlds now? Both rise into the southeast sky around nightfall or early evening in late June/early July 2020. Jupiter and Pluto climb upward throughout the evening hours, to reach the meridian roughly an hour after midnight, and then sit low in the southwest sky at daybreak.

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Postby mac5155 » Sat Jul 18, 2020 11:20 pm

So wait is one of what I think are Jupiter's moons, actually pluto?!

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Postby shafnutz05 » Sun Jul 19, 2020 7:30 am

How to see five planets and the moon without a telescope on Sunday

https://www.cnet.com/how-to/how-to-see- ... on-sunday/
"Step outside early in the morning, at least an hour before sunrise," Hunt said. "Find the four bright planets -- Venus, Mars, Saturn and Jupiter. They look like overly bright stars. Brilliant Venus is low in the east-northeast. Mars is the lone 'star' in the southeast, and Jupiter and Saturn are the stars in the southwest. To your eyes, they won't look like the photos made by spacecraft, just overly bright stars."

Mercury might be the toughest to spot. Hunt advises trying for Mercury about 45 minutes before sunrise, using binoculars.

On his website, Hunt offers tips for finding each planet. Venus, he says, will "blaze in the eastern sky." The thin crescent moon will be very low in the east-northeast part of the sky, and will only be about 1 percent illuminated. Mercury will be to the right of the moon, Mars will be about halfway up in the sky in the south-southeast, Jupiter will be just above the horizon in the southwest, and Saturn will be to the upper left of Jupiter.
Mercury was really visible last month up to two hours after sunset. It's usually extremely difficult to spot due to its proximity to sun.

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Postby shafnutz05 » Sun Jul 19, 2020 7:32 am

So wait is one of what I think are Jupiter's moons, actually pluto?!
Pluto is something like 22nd magnitude, near the limits of visibility with the nicest telescopes on Earth. Neptune and Uranus are both spottable though, the latter rarely with the naked eye and zero light pollution.

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Postby shafnutz05 » Sun Jul 19, 2020 7:58 am

Thinking about comets, I remember going outside in 1997 and just staring at Hale Bopp. It was brighter than any star in the sky except Sirius and you could see it's dust tail stretch across the sky. We will probably never see a site like that again.

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Postby Shyster » Sun Jul 19, 2020 6:20 pm

Earth and Mars are currently in relation for an optimum once-every-26-months interplanetary launch window, and three different missions are scheduled to head to Mars in the next few weeks. The first launched today: the Emirates Mars Mission. The Al Amal probe ("Hope" in Arabic) will be operated by the Mohammed Bin Rashid Space Center in cooperation with the University of Colorado-Boulder, Arizona State University, and UC Berkeley in the United States. The probe has a suite of weather sensors and is intended to research a complete picture of the Martian atmosphere—basically a "weather satellite" for Mars. It launched today aboard a Japanese H-IIA rocket from the Tanegashima Space Center in southern Japan. The trip to Mars will last around seven months.

The other two Mars missions are the Chinese Tianwen-1 three-part Mars orbiter, lander, and rover mission, which is scheduled to launch on July 23 aboard a Long March 5, and the Perseverance rover from NASA, which is scheduled to launch July 30 aboard an Atlas 5 in the 541 configuration with a five-meter fairing and four solid-rocket motors.

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Postby LITT » Mon Jul 20, 2020 3:33 pm

Nice!

For those of you with a somewhat clear view to the NNW, Comet Neowise is extremely visible with the naked eye right now. Just caught it for the first time tonight, you can clearly make out the tail and everything. Reminds me of Hale Bopp in the 90s. It will only be visible for another week or two, highly recommend getting to a spot you can see it.
i was only a wee LITT when Hale Bopp came around but i remember it much more vividly than NEOWISE

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Postby shafnutz05 » Mon Jul 20, 2020 5:47 pm

Nice!

For those of you with a somewhat clear view to the NNW, Comet Neowise is extremely visible with the naked eye right now. Just caught it for the first time tonight, you can clearly make out the tail and everything. Reminds me of Hale Bopp in the 90s. It will only be visible for another week or two, highly recommend getting to a spot you can see it.
i was only a wee LITT when Hale Bopp came around but i remember it much more vividly than NEOWISE
Oh yeah, Hale Bopp was a once in a lifetime (or even rarer) comet. It shone brighter than every star in the sky except Sirius, which is nuts in its own right, and its tail stretched 45 degrees across the sky. It was incredible.

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Postby tifosi77 » Mon Jul 20, 2020 11:58 pm

How is it that none of us noted that today was Apollo 11 lunar landing day.

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Postby eddysnake » Tue Jul 21, 2020 10:54 am

Was hoping to see the comet and it may be in there, but that's best I could see at my place. Sadly no tail, my pictures from the Canon were a disaster, have some work to do with night sky on that.

Astrophotography mode from my Pixel 3A


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Postby DigitalGypsy66 » Tue Jul 21, 2020 11:53 am

Wait. The 3A has an astrophography mode? Does the 3?

Edit: It does! A new feature when selecting Night sight. Very cool. I’ll have to play with it tonight. Not a lot of light pollution out here in the sticks.

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Postby shafnutz05 » Tue Jul 21, 2020 12:06 pm

Was hoping to see the comet and it may be in there, but that's best I could see at my place. Sadly no tail, my pictures from the Canon were a disaster, have some work to do with night sky on that.

Astrophotography mode from my Pixel 3A

Nice picture regardless! Judging by the time this was taken, it looks like maybe you were trying to spot it too early? Right after twilight disappears is the best time.

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Postby eddysnake » Tue Jul 21, 2020 12:09 pm

That picture was taken at 9:55

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Postby eddysnake » Tue Jul 21, 2020 12:10 pm

Wait. The 3A has an astrophography mode? Does the 3?

Edit: It does! A new feature when selecting Night sight. Very cool. I’ll have to play with it tonight. Not a lot of light pollution out here in the sticks.
Just put on night sight and it will toggle astrophotography mode after a few seconds. It then takes a little over a minute to process, so a tripod or resting it on something makes a huge difference

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Postby shafnutz05 » Tue Jul 21, 2020 12:16 pm

That picture was taken at 9:55
Ahh....you had some bad luck with those high clouds for sure.

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Postby LITT » Tue Jul 21, 2020 2:07 pm

neowise from ISS - starts at around 3:05 if you are impatient


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