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Postby LITT » Tue Jul 16, 2019 8:47 pm

Happy 50th anniversary to the Apollo 11 launch n at

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Postby shafnutz05 » Tue Jul 16, 2019 9:05 pm

Happy 50th anniversary to the Apollo 11 launch n at
:thumb: :thumb: :thumb:

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Postby shafnutz05 » Tue Jul 16, 2019 9:05 pm

Image

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Postby Shyster » Tue Jul 16, 2019 9:18 pm

Here's Scott Manley giving a way better explanation of the SpaceX Dragon 2 explosion than I was able to give:


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Postby mac5155 » Tue Jul 16, 2019 9:22 pm

What's the planet I'm lookin at in the southern sky right now?

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Postby mac5155 » Tue Jul 16, 2019 9:25 pm

Jupiter it seems? Kinda south southeast?

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Postby LITT » Wed Jul 17, 2019 5:44 am

Probably Saturn

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Postby Gaucho » Wed Jul 17, 2019 5:47 am

SkyMap is a very useful app.

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Postby LITT » Wed Jul 17, 2019 7:07 am

i like Star Walk 2

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Postby Gaucho » Wed Jul 17, 2019 7:13 am

Will check it out.

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Postby shafnutz05 » Wed Jul 17, 2019 8:42 am

Jupiter it seems? Kinda south southeast?
Probably Saturn
Jupiter is the brightest object in the southern sky in the evenings right now (with the exception of the Moon, of course). Two nights ago, the Moon was right next to both Jupiter and Antares, the brightest (reddish) star in Scorpius. Last night, the Moon was very close to Mars, which is rising about an hour or two after Jupiter in the evenings.

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Postby eddysnake » Wed Jul 17, 2019 8:45 am

Image

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Postby DigitalGypsy66 » Wed Jul 17, 2019 9:02 am

So cool.

I had a whole post typed up about HBO's landmark miniseries From the Earth to the Moon, how it wasn't available on Amazon Prime Video or on HBO Now/On demand. Well, HBO added it (remastered!) in time for the 50th anniversary of Apollo 11. It's an excellent series, albeit with dated CGI etc., but really paved the way for bigger series like John Adams, Band of Brothers, etc. It's worth checking out (and the book is great too).

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Postby mac5155 » Wed Jul 17, 2019 9:45 am

Jupiter it seems? Kinda south southeast?
Probably Saturn
Jupiter is the brightest object in the southern sky in the evenings right now (with the exception of the Moon, of course). Two nights ago, the Moon was right next to both Jupiter and Antares, the brightest (reddish) star in Scorpius. Last night, the Moon was very close to Mars, which is rising about an hour or two after Jupiter in the evenings.
I have skymap and can never seem to really figure it out, but it was definitely Jupiter. I want to invest in a telescope. Since we're out on the country now, there's very little light pollution. The sky is so beautiful at night.

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Postby shafnutz05 » Wed Jul 17, 2019 11:06 am

This is awesome. We are lucky that Michael Collins and Buzz Aldrin are still in such good health fifty years after Apollo 11.


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Postby Shyster » Wed Jul 17, 2019 6:02 pm

Last night SpaceX conducted a static-fire test of their "Starhopper" test vehicle , which is for the upcoming "Starship" second stage of their next big rocket. The Starhopper was chained down for this test. The Raptor engine (the sixth made) supposed had a successful firing, but afterwards it looked like some bits that shouldn't be on fire were on fire. A hose or connection might have broken, but that, of course, is the whole purpose of testing. The first "hop" of the Starhopper was supposed to be today, but that's now been delayed for investigation and repairs.

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Postby tifosi77 » Thu Jul 18, 2019 11:10 am

Project Egress

This July, the world will celebrate the 50th anniversary of Apollo 11 - the first time humankind set foot on the Moon. Join the Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum, Adam Savage, and Tested.com for a special build project to commemorate this historic event.

Using advanced 3D scans of the Apollo 11 Command Module Columbia, captured by the Smithsonian’s Digitization Program Office, and original engineering drawings from the Smithsonian archives, Adam will construct a life-size replica of the command module hatch to exhibit at the Museum.

The hatch’s components are being fabricated using various mediums and techniques by 44 artists and fabrication shops. These components will come together during a live build at the Museum in DC on July 18. The build will start at 11 am and last into the afternoon. Watch the live stream here and on Facebook.
https://airandspace.si.edu/events/project-egress-build (live stream)

They are presently unpacking all their tools and the various component pieces for the build.

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Postby Shyster » Thu Jul 18, 2019 2:50 pm

Here's another good example of just how much SpaceX is disrupting the launch market. SpaceX just won a NASA contract to launch the Imaging X-Ray Polarimetry Explorer (IXPE) mission in 2021. The payload was designed to be able to fit on the small-lift NGIS Pegasus XL rocket, which is air-launched from a jet, but SpaceX offered a package with a previously-flown booster and came in cheaper even though the Falcon 9 rocket has 50 times the lift capacity of the Pegasus XL. From what I can tell, this might be the lightest payload ever launched on a Falcon 9.

https://spacenews.com/spacex-wins-contr ... s-mission/

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Postby Shyster » Thu Jul 18, 2019 4:06 pm

Scott Manley with a nice video on how the F1 engines on the Saturn V went though the ignition sequence.



On the same sort of subject, an interesting book is Firing A Rocket: Stories of the Development of the Rocket Engines for the Saturn Launch Vehicles and the Lunar Module as Viewed from the Trenches by James French. In the 60s French worked for Rocketdyne and then TRW Systems as a test engineer, and he worked on the developmental testing of the H-1 engines for the Saturn I and IB, the F-1 and J-2 engines for the Saturn V, and the Lunar Module Descent Engine for the Apollo LEM. among others. It's a neat "I was there" sort of book. According to French, the startup sequence of the F-1 is actually pretty easy on the engine, such as those things go. The book is available for free on Kindle Unlimited.

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Postby Shyster » Fri Jul 19, 2019 6:20 pm

Everyday Astronaut answers the question, "Why was that last rung on the lunar lander so far off the ground?"


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Postby DigitalGypsy66 » Fri Jul 19, 2019 10:35 pm

That was great! Just watched the episode of From the Earth the Moon where Grumman is designing the LM for Apollo 9.

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Postby tifosi77 » Sun Jul 21, 2019 1:16 pm

Everyday Astronaut is one of my favorite YT channels. I'm kind of envious of the giant scale Falcon Heavy model.

Also, I can only find a Vimeo link, but if you can locate a video of the Apollo 50: Go For The Moon thing with the Washington Monument you need to watch that ish. It was extraordinary, and actually made me a little misty-eyed.

Had a thing yesterday where I was out and about and the SXM channel I was listening to played a time lapse of the mission audio from A11, and when it got to "Houston, Tranquility Base here. The Eagle has landed." I straight up lost my sht in my car, whooping and punching the air.

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Postby tifosi77 » Sun Jul 21, 2019 1:26 pm

I suppose I could share that Vimeo link....

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Postby DigitalGypsy66 » Mon Jul 22, 2019 10:01 am

Yeah, I rewatched the HBO miniseries I mentioned above. It’s a bit dated, but the Apollo 11 episode was really good. I got misty watching the engineers and mission control room cheer when the Eagle has landed. Bryan Cranston as Buzz Aldrin was pretty cool as well.

I can’t even imagine what it was like to see that live on TV back then. It beggars belief how big the Apollo project was - something like 400,000 people working on it at one point.

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Postby shafnutz05 » Mon Jul 22, 2019 12:16 pm

During my CG days, I got to meet Gene Kranz (Failure is not an option guy)...that was an incredible experience. He still knew how to command a room, and I was very happy to see that he is still in good shape and speaking publicly now at the age of 86.

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